Biden’s clean electricity program could be dropped from spending bill, report says – as it happened

2 months ago

Biden’s clean electricity program could be dropped from spending bill, report says – as it happened

The Guardian

Summary

That’s all for today, thanks for following along. Some key links and developments from the day:

  • The White House issued a 40-page report warning that the climate crisis “poses serious and systemic risks to the US economy and financial system”.
  • The killing of the Conservative MP David Amess, who died after being stabbed several times at an open advice surgery for his constituents in Essex, has been declared a terrorist incident in the UK.
  • The Biden administration said it plans to reinstate the Trump-era border policy known as Remain in Mexico, which forced at least 70,000 asylum seekers to stay in Mexico, many in dangerous conditions, while they waited for their cases to be considered US courts.
  • A US Food and Drug Administration panel voted unanimously to recommend the authorization of a second dose of Johnson & Johnson’s Covid-19 vaccine for people ages 18 and older at least two months after the first dose.
  • Biden conceded that the final version of his sweeping social policy and climate change initiative – often referred to as the $3.5tn reconciliation bill – would not be $3.5tn.
  • The select committee investigating the 6 January attack on the US Capitol will vote on Tuesday on whether to recommend that Steve Bannon, Donald Trump’s former strategist, face criminal contempt charges.
  • A major part of the Biden administration’s climate agenda will “likely be dropped” from the massive budget bill pending in Congress, according to a new New York Times report.
  • Biden said that people who refuse subpoenas from the House committee investigating the 6 January insurrection at the US Capitol should face prosecution.

Updated

West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin has not yet commented on the reports that the Biden administration is likely to drop the clean electricity program from the spending bill due to the senator’s opposition.

A Manchin spokesperson did not immediately respond to a Guardian’s inquiry Friday evening. The Biden administration declined to comment to the New York Times, which reported that the critical clean energy plan would “likely” be dropped because of Manchin’s position.

Earlier, the West Virginia senator tweeted a statement criticizing senator Bernie Sanders for calling on Manchin to support Biden’s $3.5tn bill:

If Manchin’s opposition does ultimately kill Biden’s clean electricity program, it would be a huge setback for the administration’s efforts to tackle the climate crisis. “He plans to gut Biden’s climate plan, and with it the chances for swift global progress,” tweeted Bill McKibben, the prominent environmentalist and Guardian contributor.

Updated

Joe Biden said that people who refuse subpoenas from the House committee investigating the 6 January insurrection at the US Capitol should face prosecution, CNN reports.

Reporter Kaitlan Collin asked the president what his message was to those who have refused subpoenas. Biden responded:

I hope that the committee goes after them and holds them accountable.”

Asked whether he thinks they should face prosecution from the US justice department, Biden said, “I do, yes,” CNN reported.

Jen Psaki, the White House press secretary, had declined to call for prosecutions when asked a similar question last week, CNN noted: “That would be up to the department of justice, and it would be their purview to determine. They’re an independent agency,” she said at the time.

Biden's clean electricity program could be dropped from spending bill, report says

A major part of the Biden administration’s climate agenda will “likely be dropped” from the massive budget bill pending in Congress, according to a new New York Times report, citing Congressional staffers and lobbyists familiar with the matter.

The program that could be cut is an initiative to replace the nation’s coal- and gas-fired power plants with wind, solar and nuclear energy, the Times’s Coral Davenport reports.

Biden’s clean energy plan would swiftly cut planet-heating emissions and, estimates have suggested, save hundreds of thousands of lives from deadly air pollution. In August, Biden also set a goal for half of all new vehicle sales in the US to be electric by 2030, and tightened pollution standards for trucks and cars.

The Times reports that Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia, the centrist Democrat who has been opposing Biden’s agenda, has told the administration that he strongly opposes the clean electricity program. The White House is now rewriting a version of the legislation that excludes that climate provision, the paper says.

Manchin, the Times noted, has personal financial ties to the coal industry.

It’s unclear if Democrats would be able to push forward a clean electricity program as its own bill if it’s removed from the spending legislation.

Earlier today, the Biden administration released a 40-page report warning that the climate crisis “poses serious and systemic risks to the US economy and financial system”.

Asked about union workers striking across the US, Joe Biden offered a brief statement of general support, the AP reports:

My message is that they have a right to strike and they have the right to demand higher wages.”

The US is currently seeing major strike efforts across industries in what could be the largest wave of labor unrest since a series of teacher strikes in 2018 and 2019, as my colleague Michael Sainato has reported.

More than 10,000 production and warehouse workers at 14 John Deere plants in Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Colorado and Georgia walked off the job this week. Roughly 1,400 Kellogg’s workers at four US plants went on strike last week after their contracts expired.

And workers in Hollywood could go on strike on Monday if the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) does not reach a deal with the studios:

Los Angeles officials are shutting down a large public park today in an effort to remove homeless encampments from the area, reigniting bitter conflicts about the city’s worsening housing crisis.

MacArthur Park, in the city’s Westlake neighborhood, is one of many public spaces in LA that became a popular camping spot for unhoused Angelenos during the pandemic, drawing hundreds of campers.At the end of September, city leaders announced that the park would be closing for “maintenance” work, with officials giving unhoused residents until today at 10.30pm to vacate.

The closure, which officials say is temporary, follows the controversial clearing of an encampment in nearby Echo Park and comes as the city is struggling to grapple with a humanitarian crisis that has significantly worsened since the pandemic.

In March, the police department spent $2m over four days enforcing the closure of Echo Park. A county spokesman said this week that of the 183 people who were living in the park before its shutdown, only four people have been placed in permanent housing. The majority of the remaining residents are still in temporary housing, the county said.

Arizona senator Kyrsten Sinema, the centrist Democrat who has been blocking the Biden administration’s major economic package, has raised more campaign money in the last three months than in any quarter since she became senator, according to a new Politico report.

She raised $1.1 million with significant assistance from the pharmaceutical and financial industries, with executives and political action committees donating to her amid the negotiations over infrastructure and social safety net spending, the publication reported.

Sinema and Joe Manchin, the other centrist Democrat, have said they would not support a $3.5 trillion plan, and Sinema has objected prescription drug pricing proposals, the report noted. The Arizona senator received $27,800 from Pacs of pharmaceutical companies from July through September, Politico said.

For more on Sinema, here’s a recent profile from the Guardian’s Lauren Gambino:

The gunman who killed 14 students and three staff members at Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school in 2018 will plead guilty to their murders, his attorneys said today.

Attorneys for the 23-year-old shooter told a judge that he will plead guilty on Wednesday to 17 counts of first-degree murder, and the pleas will come with no conditions. Prosecutors are expected to seek the death penalty, which a jury will rule on, the AP reports. A trial date has not yet been scheduled. More from the AP:

Nikolas Cruz will also plead guilty to 17 counts of attempted first-degree murder. He was not initially present during the hearing, but later entered the Broward county courtroom to plead guilty to attacking a jail guard nine months after the shooting.

The trial has been delayed by the pandemic and arguments between the prosecution and defense over what evidence and testimony could be presented to the jury. Some victims’ families had expressed frustration over the delays, but the president of the group they formed expressed relief that the case now seems closer to resolution.

“We just hope the system gives him justice,” said Tony Montalto of Stand With Parkland. His 14-year-old daughter, Gina, died in the shooting.

The Guardian’s Gabrielle Canon has been reporting on the environmental impacts of the bottleneck plaguing the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles, two of the nation’s busiest ports:

Dozens of behemoth cargo ships adorned with tall stacks of brightly colored containers still dot the coastline off southern California. Part of a shipping bottleneck plaguing US ports, the ships – their diesel-fueled engines always ablaze – are also pumping out pollutants as they idle, anchored off-shore.

The clogged supply chain has been described as an economic calamity as the delayed cargo caused shortages in common goods and drove consumer prices higher. But environmentalists and public health advocates are concerned it’s also turning into a climate catastrophe.

The container ships awaiting entry are compounding the levels of contaminants that have long come from the ports and that impact the local environment, coastal communities and ambitious carbon targets needed to curb the worst effects of climate change. With the holiday shopping frenzy just around the corner, there are now concerns the problem may get worse before it gets better.

Texas House passes anti-trans sports bill

The Texas House of Representatives passed a bill to ban transgender women and girls from participating in school sports, the latest in a series of anti-trans bills that Republicans have adopted in state legislatures across the US this year.

The bill is returning to the Texas Senate for a procedural approval, and Republican governor, Greg Abbott, is expected to sign the bill, Reuters reports.

Sports bills limiting the access of trans girls to teams have been passed this year in Arkansas, Florida, Mississippi and West Virginia. Bills that more broadly ban trans kids from playing on the teams that match their gender were signed into law in Alabama, Montana and Tennessee. Arkansas also passed a second sports-related law that creates an enforcement mechanism for its ban.

Idaho passed a similar sports ban last year, but the federal courts have blocked it.

In 2021, lawmakers proposed more than 100 anti-trans bills across 37 states, with a majority of the proposals focused on restricting trans children’s access to athletics and healthcare.

Our previous reporting on the sports bills:

Hi all - Sam Levin in Los Angeles here, taking over our live coverage for the rest of the day.

The Biden administration has said it plans to reinstate the controversial “Remain in Mexico” policy that has forced tens of thousands of asylum seekers to wait in Mexico before their cases are considered in the US. Biden had rescinded the policy when he took office, but a judge ordered his administration to reinstate it.

My colleague Amanda Holpuch has more detail:

In a court filing late on Friday, the US justice department said the program’s reinstatement depended on approval from the Mexican government, which is asking for the asylum cases to be settled in six months and for the US to ensure the people affected have timely and accurate information as well as better access to legal counsel. The program is expected to be back in effect in mid-November.

Donald Trump introduced Remain in Mexico in January 2019. From the beginning, advocates criticized the program because it put highly vulnerable migrants, mostly from Central and South America, at serious risk of physical harm and illness as they waited in some of the most dangerous cities in the world. It also fails to address the forces pushing people north to the US-Mexico border and the huge backlogs in US immigration courts.

Campaign group Human Rights Watch said in a January report about the policy that affected asylum seekers it interviewed, including children, “described rape or attempted rape and other sexual assault, abduction for ransom, extortion, armed robbery, and other crimes committed against them”.

Today so far

•Joe Biden admitted that the final version of his sweeping social policy and climate change initiative – often referred to as the $3.5tn reconciliation bill – would not be $3.5tn. “We’ll get less than that,” Biden said during a speech in Hartford, Connecticut. The White House and Democratic leaders are racing to trim the bill to win the support of centrist holdouts, senators Kyrsten Sinema and Joe Manchin.

•The select committee investigating the January 6 attack on the US Capitol will vote on Tuesday on whether to recommend that Steve Bannon face criminal contempt charges. Bannon, a key Trump advisor, defied a subpoena to appear before the committee, after the former president instructed his aides to defy the subpoenas, on grounds that any discussions that involved him were protected by executive privilege.

A Capitol police officer has been charged with obstruction of justice in connection to the deadly January 6 attack in Washington. Federal prosecutors say Michael Riley, a 25-year veteran of Capitol police, helped one of the participants in the attack by encouraging them to take down incriminating Facebook posts in the aftermath of January 6.

•David Amess, a British MP, died after he was stabbed multiple times during a constituency meeting in south-east England. In a statement police said a man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after Amess was attacked at Belfairs Methodist church in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex.

The Biden administration said Friday it will turn next to the US Supreme Court in another attempt to halt a Texas law that has banned most abortions since September, Associated Press reports.

The move comes as the Texas clinics are running out of avenues to stop the GOP-engineered law that bans abortions once cardiac activity is detected, which is usually around six weeks – before many women realize they are pregnant.

It amounts to the nation’s biggest curb to abortion in nearly 50 years and makes no exception for cases of rape or incest.

By going to the Supreme Court, the Justice Department is taking the route that clinics have sought as other legal challenges have failed.

In the meantime, Texas women have turned to abortion clinics in neighboring states, some driving hours through the middle of the night and including patients as young as 12 years old.

The latest defeat for clinics came on Thursday night when a federal appeals panel in New Orleans allowed the restrictions to remain in place for a third time in the last several weeks alone. Justice Department spokesman Anthony Coley said the federal government will now ask the Supreme Court to reverse that decision but did not say how quickly.

House committee to vote Tuesday on Steve Bannon criminal contempt charges

The select committee investigating the January 6 attack on the US Capitol will vote on Tuesday on whether to recommend that Steve Bannon, Donald Trump’s former strategist, face criminal contempt charges over his refusal to appear before the panel.

In a statement the committee, chaired by Rep Bennie Thompson, said it would convene for a meeting on Tuesday October 19 at 7.30pm.

Bannon defied a subpoena to appear before the committee after Trump instructed his aides to defy the subpoenas, on grounds that any discussions that involved him were protected by executive privilege.

Bannon was reportedly in close conference with Trump in the lead up to the deadly January 6 insurrection.

Biden admitted earlier his free community college proposal was unlikely to make the final version of the Democrats’ social police and climate change plan – seemingly acquiescing to the multiple demands of moderate senators including Joe Manchin, from West Virginia, and Kyrsten Sinema, from Arizona.

CNN reported that Manchin, on a call with a group of Democrats this week, had reiterated his opposition to free community college for all.

The senator, whose vote is required if Biden is to pass a version of his bill, also “raised concerns” on the call over the proposed expansion of Medicare to include dental, vision and hearing coverage, according to CNN.

Manchin reportedly also voiced his opposition to his party’s plan to meaningfully cut greenhouse gas emissions by 2030.

Updated

'We'll get less than that': Biden on $3.5n spending package

Joe Biden conceded on Friday that the final version of his sweeping social policy and climate change initiative – often referred to as the $3.5tn reconciliation bill – would not be $3.5tn.

“We’re not going to get $3.5tn. We’ll get less than that,” Biden said, during an event at the Capitol Child Development Center in Hartford, Connecticut.

“But we’re gonna get it, and we’re gonna come back and get the rest.”

The White House and Democratic leaders are racing to trim the bill to win the support of centrist holdouts, senators Kyrsten Sinema and Joe Manchin, without whom the measure cannot pass. Both have balked at the top-line figure, but infuriated their colleagues by not providing more specifics on what they will and will not support in the bill.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi recently acknowledged the reality during a press conference earlier this week. “The fact is, that if there are fewer dollars to spend there are choices to be made,” she said.

As Democrats race to chisel the bill down to about $2tn, they must decide whether to keep the sweep of the programs proposed in the legislation – paid family leave, child care, community college, Medicare expansion – with shorter funding periods or narrow the scope and fund fewer programs longer. In his remarks on Friday, Biden offered a glimpse of where the negotiations stood, warning that his proposal for free community college might not make the cut.

“We’re going to get something less than that, but I’m going to negotiate,” Biden said. “But I’m going to get it done with the grace of God and the goodwill of the neighbors and the crick not rising.”

Joe Biden speaks at the Capitol Child Development Center on Friday.
Joe Biden speaks at the Capitol Child Development Center on Friday. Photograph: Evan Vucci/AP

In his speech, which focused on how the bill would make childcare and education more affordable, Biden spoke about his own experience raising two young boys as a single father after the death of his first wife and daughter.

“I could not afford childcare,” he said, recalling his days traveling back and forth between Washington and Delaware, where he lived. “Everybody wonders why I commuted [by train] every day, 265 miles a day, to be back and forth for my children. I could afford the train. It was cheaper.”

At the end of his remarks, Biden said he had been in touch with Bill Clinton, who was hospitalized for an infection and “on the mend”. Knocking on wood, Biden said the former president was “doing well.”

Updated

From Joe Biden’s speech earlier. After the president’s wife and daughter were killed in a car crash in 1972, the then-senator commuted to Washington from Delaware by train.

Joe Biden is speaking now at an event in Connecticut and is once again pitching his flagship Build Back Better flagship package of legislation - a $1tn bill to overhaul America’s roads, bridges and other infrastructure and a $3.5tn bill of social benefits and climate action.

The US president is talking up the bills now, promising “competitiveness not complacency” and efforts “rebuilding the arteries of our economy.

The budgetary legislation - which is likely to shrink from its $3.5tn price tag as negotiations between the White House and conservative Democrats continue - is crucial to the issue of government money to pay for childcare.

Biden is talking about that now, saying that even as a well-paid US Senator with two young sons to look after (after his wife and daughter were killed in a car crash), he was not able to afford childcare and needed the help of his family and commuted daily between Washington and Delaware because the train was cheaper than childcare.

He’s pointing out that nowadays, average quality childcare costs around $16,000 a year. Biden wants to, very roughly, halve that.

Build Back Better is still in the balance as leading conservative and progressive Democrats bombard the White House with opposite demands.

Quick on the tweet is White House principal deputy press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre.

Updated

Panel advising FDA recommends Johnson & Johnson boosters

A panel of advisers to the US Food and Drug Administration has today voted unanimously to recommend the authorization of a second dose of Johnson & Johnson’s Covid-19 vaccine for people aged 18 and older at least two months after the first dose, the Reuters news agency has reported.

Unlike Pfizer or Moderna, the other two coronavirus vaccines approved in the US, which involve two injections several weeks apart, J&J is a single-shot vaccine developed with different technology.

The FDA itself and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will now issue their own opinions on the booster.

Pfizer’s booster is already approved. Yesterday, independent advisers also told the FDA they were in favor of Moderna’s booster, a half shot of that company’s vaccine.

Updated

Chicago mayor Lori Lightfoot has filed a complaint in court against Chicago’s largest police union and its president after a directive for officers to ignore a citywide mandate to report their vaccination status, the latest in an ongoing battle between government officials and first responders over vaccine mandates.

Chicago mayor Lori Lightfoot (right), with Illinois governor JB Pritzker (left), president of the National Mexican Museum of Art Carolos Tortolero and Illinois Senator Tammy Duckworth, earlier this month.
Chicago mayor Lori Lightfoot (right), with Illinois governor JB Pritzker (left), president of the National Mexican Museum of Art Carolos Tortolero and Illinois Senator Tammy Duckworth, earlier this month. Photograph: Karen I Hirsch/ZUMA Press Wire/REX/Shutterstock

In a statement issued this morning, Lightfoot announced that she had instructed the city’s law department to file a complaint for injuctive relief against the Chicago chapter of the Fraternal Order of Police union and its president John Catanzara for essentially encouraging an illegal strike following the anti-vaccine mandate comments.

“As Chicago’s Mayor, I cannot and will not stand idly by while the rhetoric of conspiracy theorists threatens the health and safety of Chicago’s residents and first responders,” said Lightfoot in the statement.

“President Catanzara has time and again deliberately misled our police officers by lying about the requirements of the policy and falsely claiming that there will be no repercussions if officers are insubordinate and refuse to follow a City and Department directive or order.”

On Tuesday, Catanzara posted an online video, criticizing the vaccine mandate requirement announced in August from the Lightfoot administration that required city workers to get fully vaccinated and report their vaccination status by Friday. As per the mandate, which covers more than 30,000 city workers, for employees that remained unvaccinated, only after being granted religious or medical exemptions, and refused semiweekly coronavirus testing, employees would be placed on unpaid leave.

In the clip posted to YouTube, Catanzara said he would sue the Lightfoot administration if they tried to enforce the mandate and suggested that many Chicago police department (CPD) officers would be unwilling to comply. Catanzara then instructs CPD employees to petition for vaccine exemptions but not to enter the required information into the city’s vaccination portal.

The progressive group Indivisible has launched a “Give no ground” initiative to protect eight progressive Democrats at risk of losing their seats in the 2022 mid-terms.

Indivisible said it would direct resources to seven House races and one Senate race – the re-election bid of Raphael Warnock, who won a US Senate run-off election in January.

Lucy Solomon, Indivisible’s national political director, told CNN the group was “prioritizing members of Congress in competitive districts and states who have shown up as champions for President Biden’s agenda. These incumbents are working to make the promises of 2020 a reality, and they need our support to continue the fight”.

CNN reported that the program “is also designed to highlight the work of lower-profile Democratic members” who “have been committed to passing party-line legislation that includes broadly popular provisions like universal child care and lowering prescription drug prices”.

“The broader progressive movement is really looking to be strategic,” Solomon said.

“Indivisible can help direct (Democratic voters) to really focus on some people who may not be the flashiest members, but who we know have been doing really strong work in Congress, being responsive to their constituents and working to enact the Biden agenda.”

Raphael Warnock won his Senate seat in January.
Raphael Warnock won his Senate seat in January. Photograph: Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images

Capitol police officer charged with obstruction of justice

A Capitol police officer has been charged with obstruction of justice in connection to the deadly January 6 attack in Washington.

Federal prosecutors say Michael Riley, a 25-year veteran of Capitol police, helped one of the participants in the attack by encouraging them to take down incriminating Facebook posts.

In the indictment prosecutors said Riley had contacted a Facebook user who had posted selfies showing them inside the Capitol building during the January 6 insurrection.

“Im a capitol police officer who agrees with your political stance [sic],” Riley wrote in a direct message to the user, according to the indictment.

“Take down the part about being in the building they are currently investigating and everyone who was in the building is going to be charged. Just looking out!”

Updated

Barack Obama will travel to Glasgow for the Cop26 climate change conference next month, his office said.

The former president will meet with young climate activists and “deliver remarks putting the threat of climate change in broader context”, according to an Obama spokeswoman.

“He will lay out the important progress made in the five years since the Paris Agreement took effect, highlight the leadership of young people around the globe, and urge more robust action going forward by all of us - governments, the private sector, philanthropy, and civil society,” the spokeswoman said.

Joe Biden will also be at the summit, along with 13 cabinet members and senior officials. More than 190 world leaders are expected to attend.

Today so far

  • David Amess, a British lawmaker, has died after he was stabbed multiple times during a constituency meeting. Police said a man had been arrested and a knife had been recovered at the scene in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, in south-east England. UK politicians have paid tribute to Amess, a long-standing Conservative politician. MPs’ security is to be reviewed in the wake of Amess’ death.
  • The House committee investigating the 6 January insurrection has issued stern warnings about the consequences of refusing to appear before the panel. The committee is considering a criminal contempt referral against Steve Bannon, Trump’s former strategist, after he defied a subpoena to appear. “This is just the beginning. I assure you, there are others. If they do not cooperate, they will suffer the same fate,” Bennie Thompson, the committee chair, said.
  • The US will lift its Covid-19 travel restrictions for fully vaccinated foreign nationals from 33 countries on 8 November, the White House said. The restrictions have barred many non-US citizens from entering the country, including tens of thousands of foreign nationals with relatives in the US. Non-US citizens from the UK, China, India, South Africa, Iran, Brazil and a number of European countries will now be allowed to travel to the US.
  • Joe Biden’s administration issued a report warning that the climate crisis “poses serious and systemic risks to the US economy and financial system”. The 40-page report, issued as the crucial Cop26 global climate talks are due to begin in Scotland at the end of the month, sets out steps for action as “climate impacts are already affecting American jobs, homes, families’ hard-earned savings, and businesses”.

Updated

Members of the House committee investigating the January 6 insurrection have issued stern warnings about the consequences of refusing to appear before the panel.

The committee is considering a criminal contempt referral against Steve Bannon, Trump’s former strategist, who defied a subpoena and refused to speak before the committee.

On Friday Adam Kinzinger, a Republican congressman, spoke to CNN about Bannon.

“We’re serious about this. And anybody that is either being subpoenaed now or will be in the future — think twice before you reject a lawful order from Congress,” Kinzinger said.

Earlier Bennie Thompson, the committee chair, discussed the likelihood of witnesses being held in criminal contempt with MSNBC.

“This is just the beginning. I assure you, there are others. If they do not cooperate, they will suffer the same fate,” Thompson said.

Bennie Thompson.
Bennie Thompson. Photograph: Oliver Contreras/EPA

Updated

US to lift Covid travel ban for vaccinated travelers on November 8

The White House said it will lift Covid-19 travel restrictions for fully vaccinated foreign nationals from November 8, Reuters reported:

The restrictions have barred travelers from most of the world, including tens of thousands of foreign nationals with relatives in the US.

The White House announced on September 20 that the US would lift restrictions on air travelers from 33 countries in early November, but did not specify the date at the time.

On Tuesday the Biden administration announced it would lift restrictions at its land borders and ferry crossings with Canada and Mexico for fully vaccinated foreign nationals in early November.

David Amess MP dies after being stabbed multiple times

The British MP David Amess has died after he was stabbed multiple times during a constituency meeting, police said.

Amess was attacked on Friday at Belfairs Methodist church in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, in south-east England. In a statement police said a man has been arrested on suspicion of murder.

Here’s the latest statement from Essex police:

We were called to an address in Eastwood Road North shortly after 12.05pm today (Friday 15 October).

We attended and found a man injured. He was treated by emergency services but, sadly, died at the scene.

A 25-year-old man was quickly arrested after officers arrived at the scene on suspicion of murder and a knife was recovered. He is currently in custody.

We are not looking for anyone else in connection with this incident.

Amess, 69, is a well-known Conservative party backbencher who has never held a ministerial or shadow ministerial post during his 38 years in parliament, instead campaigning on issues including animal rights. He is married with five children.

My UK colleagues have the latest here:

Updated

Here’s Mark Brnovich, the Republican Attorney General of Arizona and expected 2022 US Senate candidate, playing with some nunchucks this morning.

Brnovich, who is 54-years-old, is polling way ahead of his GOP rivals to challenge Mark Kelly, the incumbent, in next year’s election.

Donald Trump has criticized Brnovich for not doing enough to further the fantasy that the 2020 election was stolen.

Updated

Joe Biden’s administration on Friday issued a report warning that the climate crisis “poses serious and systemic risks to the US economy and financial system”.

The 40-page report, issued as the crucial Cop26 global climate talks are due to begin in Scotland at the end of the month, sets out steps for action as “climate impacts are already affecting American jobs, homes, families’ hard-earned savings, and businesses”.

The report lays out what the White House calls government-wide plans to protect the economy with steps that potentially alter the mortgage process, stock market disclosures, retirement plans, federal procurement and government budgeting.

“The intensifying impacts of climate change present physical risk to assets, publicly traded securities, private investments, and companies … the failure of financial institutions … account for and measure these … risks threatens the competitiveness of US companies and markets, the life savings and pensions of US workers and families, and the ability of US financial institutions to serve communities,” the president said in the report.

Updated

British MP stabbed at constituency meeting

The Conservative MP David Amess has been stabbed multiple times while holding a constituency surgery, his office and police said on Friday. A man has been arrested.

The veteran MP, who has represented Southend West in Essex, south-east England, since 1983, was attacked at Belfairs Methodist church in Leigh-on-Sea, Sky News first reported.

In a brief statement, Essex police said a man had been arrested following an incident in Leigh-on-Sea.

They said: “We were called to reports of a stabbing in Eastwood Road North shortly after 12.05pm. A man was arrested shortly after and we’re not looking for anyone else. We’ll bring you more info when we have it.”

The Sky report said a man walked into the constituency surgery and stabbed the MP a number of times, and that Amess was receiving treatment at the scene.

Follow here for the latest updates:

David Amess was stabbed “multiple times” on Friday.
David Amess was stabbed “multiple times” on Friday. Photograph: Richard Townshend/UK PARLIAMENT/AFP/Getty Images

Updated

Good morning and welcome to the Guardian US politics liveblog...

  • Two more members of Donald Trump’s inner-circle are scheduled to appear before the House January 6 committee today, after the committee chair said he would consider a criminal contempt referral against Steve Bannon, Trump’s former strategist who defied a subpoena and refused to speak before the panel.
  • Mark Meadows and Dan Scavino, who served in Trump’s White House, have been subpoenaed to testify at the House select committee investigating the Capitol attack. The committee said last week it had been “engaging” with Meadows, but it is unclear whether Trump’s former chief of staff will cooperate.
  • FDA experts are meeting today to consider authorizing a booster shot of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. The FDA approved a Moderna booster on Thursday, that recommendation will be considered by a panel of independent experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention next week.
Ad